Sangga Outdoors Hammock Review

Sangga Outdoors Ora 11 Hammock Review

My trip to DRT Bulacan got me excited because aside from it being my first waterfalls adventure since the pandemic, it’s also my chance to finally try my Sangga hammock (Ora 11) outdoors. I’ve already slept on it indoors but the best way to get to know a hammock is hanging it under the mercy of the elements like the sun, wind and rain. I shifted from tent to hammocks on my camping trips since 2017 because of the numerous benefits of hammock camping. Testing and sharing my review of different local hammocks is my way to spread awareness about hammocks, while supporting local brands at the same time.

My Sangga Ora 11 Hammock Package

Sangga Outdoors Ora 11 Hammock
Sangga Outdoors Ora 11 Hammock

The hammock I’m going to review in this post is Sangga Outdoor‘s Ora 11, a lightweight single-ply hammock complete with bug net and suspension system. The base package costing 1,135Php includes a pair of 3-meter black webbing straps respectively connected to the gathered ends of the hammock. An upgraded package, which is what we are reviewing here, with friction rings for an easier suspension system is available at 1,385Php.

There are other variations offered by Sangga Outdoors such as cocoon-type and ultralight hammocks but since I hate mosquitoes, I picked Ora 11 with bug net. Made from  parachute nylon fabric and measuring 9.5 ft x 5ft, Ora 11 weighs only 800grams, which is pretty lightweight for a complete hammock system. Read the next section for my review of this lightweight hammock from Sangga Outdoors.

 

Sangga Outdoors Ora 11 Hammock Review

From years of using hammocks with netting system, I’m pretty much firm with my standards. Here’s what I think are the cons and pros of Ora 11. 

What I love about it:

Ora 11's stuff sack doubling as side pocket.
Ora 11's stuff sack doubling as side pocket.
Sangga Outdoors Ulitralight Hammock
Sangga Outdoors Ulitralight Hammock

Unique and simply vibrant design

At first look, Ora 11 seems like your typical parachute nylon hammock in plain color. But once you inspect it, you’ll be surprised at its well-thought-out architecture. The built-in bug net and ridgeline are nothing I have seen in other hammocks before. More details will be discussed below about these 2 features which make it stand out from a crowd of similarly-designed hammocks.

Its sack is stitched to one edge removing the chance of losing it, and at the same time doubles as a side pocket. There are also 4 guy-outs with reflectors as identifiers in the dark. I’ve never really used a hammock with guy-outs but I’ve read that they also help with having a flat lay and keeping the bug net from sagging inside.

The colors are happy and vibrant as you can see in the photos. My yellow Ora 11 made a gloomy campsite a little brighter. I also got my friend a red Ultralight hammock from Sangga Outdoors weighing 500 grams only and it definitely stood out.

Well-ventilated

Thanks to the tandem of the breathable parachute nylon material and the built-in thin bug net, sleeping in this hammock on summer won’t make you feel uncomfortable. I’ve slept on it in my bedroom  and even without the electric fan, it didn’t feel sticky. Also, unlike other hammocks with bug net, Ora 11’s thin netting doesn’t reduce ventilation and doesn’t darken the outside view.

Of course it’s a different story when it’s windy and cold. In such weather condition, a sleeping bag or under quilt is necessary to keep me warm. After all, the hammock is a replacement to the tent only, and not to the sleeping bag.

Sangga Ora 11 with bug-net deployed
Sangga Ora 11 with bug-net deployed
Sangga Ora 11's built-in ridgeline allows you to achieve the perfect sag each time.
Sangga Ora 11's built-in ridgeline allows you to achieve the perfect sag each time.

Built-in Ridgeline

When I was just starting my hammock journey, I’ve read from blogs that a ridge line tied to both ends of the hammock may be used to achieve the perfect sag. Since I am not really good at knots, I was not successful at setting up my own ridge line before. That’s why I was impressed to see that Sangga Ora 11 has a built-in adjustable ridge line, which doubly acts as hanger for the built-in bug net. Once I hang the hammock, the ridge line automatically sets the sag I desire.

This is specifically helpful when trees/poles are too far apart from each other; the tension in the straps increases and the sag decreases making it difficult to achieve the ideal 30-degree hang. However, with the help of the ridgeline, you can maintain the ideal sag even on trees that are too far apart, as long as your straps can span them.

Lightweight, Quick-dry and Durable

For Ora 11, Sangga Outdoors uses a kind of thin parachute nylon which makes it lightweight and quick-dry. This is a big consideration for backpackers and hikers like me who are trying to turn down their base weight. The hammock is pretty spacious at 9.5 ft x 5ft but stays at 800 grams only which is a little lighter than my other hammock+bug net system. The capacity is impressive, too, at 150kg which is good for lounging two people. I’ve only using it for a month so let’s see how it keeps up after years.

When I tried camping at DRT Bulacan, the weather was not pleasant; the rain was on and off and little splashes from my tarp would reach the Ora 11. To my surprise, the water didn’t leak to the other side of the hammock, and quickly dried after a few minutes. I must say that this material is pretty cool.

The material used is almost perfect being lightweight, quick-dry and durable, but comfort is a little bit compromised since hammock is not stretchable.

 

 

Sangga Outdoor's Ora 11 is spacious but lightweight, quick dry and durable.
Sangga Outdoor's Ora 11 is spacious but lightweight, quick dry and durable.
You can barely notice the bugnet in Sangga Outdoors' Ora 11
You can barely notice the bugnet in Sangga Outdoors' Ora 11
Ora 11's bug net can be kept inside this pouch when not in use.
Ora 11's bug net can be kept inside this pouch when not in use.

Built-in Bug Net

I know I already mentioned bug net previously but it has to have its own section because it is quite impressive for me. Its characteristics can either be a pro or a con depending on who’s using it. First, Ora 11’s bug net is thinner than most local hammock bug nets I’ve tried. This is a pro for me because I love to stare at the view outside. A thinner bug net keeps the bugs at bay without darkening the view, which is perfect for stargazing. It’s still decently durable though, but still needs extra care to keep it from tearing up.

Secondly, the bug net can be completely unzipped from both edges of the hammock to keep it away when not in use. There is a tiny pouch at one end of the ridge line to neatly keep it, unlike other hammock+bug net systems where the net is permanently stitched on one edge. Since there is more length to unzip, it takes a little more effort to put away the net.

Lastly, you don’t need a bungee decently elevated to hang the net since the built-in ridge line already does the job.

Quick Set Up

Finally, Sangga Outdoors’ Ora 11 with friction rings is a breeze to set up. Just tie one end of webbing straps on the respective trees/poles and slip through the other end on the rings at the ends of the hammock. Adjusting is so easy, too! You’ll be done setting up the hammock in less than a minute.

Friction rings makes the set-up quick and easy.
Friction rings makes the set-up quick and easy.

What I hope could be improved:

  • I mentioned previously that the parachute nylon fabric is what makes Ora 11 lightweight, quick-dry, and durable but it compromises a little bit on comfort. Since the hammock material is non-stretchable,  it feels a little stiff on pressure points from my body. That is, my arm and leg fats (haha!) could get a little squeezed by the fabric. It doesn’t completely stop me from sleeping comfortably from the hammock, though. I could still sleep safe and sound in my Ora 11; besides, an inflatable mattress that serves as my under layer can compensate for complete comfort.
  • The reversible zipper of Ora 11 is a little tiny smooth; my grip could easily lose it when pulling to zip/unzip. But this can easily be remedied by tying paracord as zipper pullers.
    Reflectorized guyouts and reversible zippers of Ora 11.
    Reflectorized guyouts and reversible zippers of Ora 11.

Conclusion and Recommendations

Overall, I would recommend Sangga Outdoor’s Ora 11 for outdoor enthusiasts who prioritize keeping their base weight light, without compromising convenient features such as the built-in ridge-line, bug net, and excellent ventilation. You can even go ultralight with their 500-gram minimalist hammock. Just make sure that when camping on colder sites, you have ample warming system such as a sleeping bag or inflatable mattress + blanket. However, if you’re intending a hammock for just backyard hanging where weight isn’t an issue, there are more comfortable materials that you can consider. For inquiries about Ora 11 and other hammock offerings, message Sangga Outdoors’ FB page

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